Calendar.help is freaking.amazing

Calendar.help is freaking.amazing

First things first, what is Calendar.help?

Calendar.help does one thing really well: schedule your meetings.
With the speed of artificial intelligence and the personal touch of a human assistant, Calendar.help takes care of business.

To be a little more precise, Calendar.help is an automated way for Office 365 users to schedule meetings. It eliminates the usual back and forth which takes place when trying to arrange meetings, whether they be with colleagues or external contacts. Simply cc your email to cortana@calendar.help and the rest is taken care of. There’s only 1 requirement – an Office 365 account.

The service is still in preview which means you have to sign up and wait for an invitation before you can begin using it. It took less than 24 hours for my invitation to arrive. To sign up click here.

Setting up the service took me less than 4 minutes and basically involved logging in to Office 365 account and clicking a few buttons. Very simple.

What happened next was pretty impressive – Cortana organised a meeting between Andres, presumably someone on the Calendar.help team, and me. Andres is going to tell me more about Calendar.help – can’t wait. This was a great introduction to the power of the product and automation in general.

To get my hands dirty I decided to try scheduling a meeting with a colleague. I sent him an email and cc’ed cortana@calendar.help as instructed. Within minutes Cortana had organised a 15-minute meeting in our calendars for next week. Too easy!

I’ve really only scratched the surface of what Calendar.help can do. As artificial intelligence becomes more prominent we’ll start to see more rudimentary tasks such as scheduling outsourced to computers. As my first real experience with AI, I have to say it’s very exciting.

I recommend signing up and having a play with Calendar.help yourself. If you’re not using Office 365 already this is just another great reason to get started.

Link – https://calendar.help/

Reference – thanks to Robert Crane for the heads up